The American stamp of approval in the modelling industry

New York is the centre of the modelling universe - here's why.

 Chinese model Jing Wen (Supreme) for   Teen Vogue   February 2015 by Jason Kibbler. Wen has also appeared in campaigns for Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger. 

Chinese model Jing Wen (Supreme) for Teen Vogue February 2015 by Jason Kibbler. Wen has also appeared in campaigns for Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger. 

By Natalia Zurowski

There's no denying the incredible amount of influence the United States has when it comes to determining market trends. In respect to modelling, New York is the epicentre of the industry - the same can be said when it comes to fashion and design. Before they've learned much else about the industry, new models already know that New York is where careers are made. If they're successful in New York and receive the American stamp of approval, their careers can flourish.

Whether the US is a fashion innovator is up for debate, but it's an undeniable economic powerhouse. Ranging from high end clients, beauty brands, and e-commerce giants, the US is home to some of fashion's top brands and companies such as: Alexander Wang, Marc Jacobs, Calvin Klein, The Gap, Tommy Hilfiger, Michael Kors, Maybelline, Nordstrom, Victoria's Secret, and so forth. These clients don't only pay top dollar, but also act as prestigious endorsements of a model's caliber and relevance to other clients, agencies, and the media. 

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IMG pulls out of Miami Swim Week

Some big changes are hitting Miami, and will surely alter the casting experience.

The Miami Herald reports:

 Models walk the Luli Fama show at The Raleigh on July 20, 2014 in Miami | Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Luli Fama via  Source

Models walk the Luli Fama show at The Raleigh on July 20, 2014 in Miami | Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for Luli Fama via Source

Miami’s annual Swim Week, a series of fashion shows, parties and trade exhibits attended by international press, designers and fashionistas, will be sporting a noticeably skimpier cut this year.
Executives at IMG Fashion, which presents the July swimsuit show’s main attraction – the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim inside air-conditioned tents outside the Raleigh Hotel on Miami Beach – announced they would be “postponing” their show until 2016 as part of a company-wide redesign to “better reflect the unique needs of its designers and partners.”
Other Swim Week events are expected to continue as planned.
IMG’s decision not to participate this year was the result of several factors, beginning with the purchase of the company by William Morris Endeavor for $2.3 billion in 2013. Since the sale, IMG has been retooling the various Fashion Week events it hosts in cities around the world, including New York, following the loss of Mercedes-Benz as a sponsor.

Read the full article here.

Good read: 'A great catalogue model'

In an article for Fashionista.com, Lauren Sherman explores how e-commerce has transformed the business of commercial modelling. 

 Michele Ouellet is a commercial client favourite. Here, she appears in the Rockport Spring 2014 campaign cast by Lisa Leder | Models.com

Michele Ouellet is a commercial client favourite. Here, she appears in the Rockport Spring 2014 campaign cast by Lisa Leder | Models.com

Money girls, as the industry likes to call them, have always been a big part of the fashion business, thanks to catalogs and campaigns. But e-commerce has increased their exposure. Now, instead of seeing Ouellet in a monthly magazine or a bimonthly catalog, frequent shoppers might see her face once or twice a day on various websites. (And that's not counting her popular Instagram account.) The advent of online shopping has made commercial models more valuable than ever for brands. 

That's not to say editorial and commercial models don't crossover beyond Victoria's Secret Angels walking in the occasional Prada runway show. Jacquelyn Jablonski is as present in the J.Crew catalog as she is on the runway, while another J.Crew star -- RJ Rogenski -- has become a favorite of just about every men's magazine. (Oullet, too, appears in editorial and occasionally walks the runway.) "There used to be the show girls, the editorial girls, and then there were the money girls," Dakin says. "Now the money girls are walking. And the girls walking are shooting. The catalogs wanted to be cool, and the runways needed more mass appeal."

Read the full article here.

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